Helicopter sound arouses crocodiles

And other stories from the stranger side of life

A crocodile
(Image credit: Ian Waldie/Getty Image)

A study has found that the "thunderous sound" made by the rotor blades of military helicopters "provokes sex frenzies among saltwater crocodiles in Australia", said The Telegraph. The researchers concluded that the "sonorous thump of the choppers" sounds "either like the mating roar of rival males" or "evokes the sound of thunder", which signals the onset of the wet season and breeding time, said the paper. The curious trend has been observed at a crocodile farm in Queensland.

Dead man to be buried after 128 years

A mummified man is going to receive a belated burial after being on display at a funeral home in the US for 128 years. The man died in a local jail in 1895, where he suffered from kidney failure. He was accidentally mummified by an undertaker who was experimenting with new embalming techniques, and has been on display in Pennsylvania ever since. His hair and teeth remain intact, and his skin has taken on a leathery appearance, noted Sky News.

Celery accident in Canada

Traffic was being diverted from a Canadian highway after a truck rolled over and spilled its load of celery across the roadway. Ontario Provincial Police said the truck covered the roadway in celery stalks after it overturned on Highway 400, just south of Highway 9 in the Aurora area. "So much celery," the force wrote on social media along with a video of the vegetable-strewn road. No injuries were reported.

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